The second oldest profession in the wrold
Corvus albus
amonseuldesir
  
I think it was Stefan Zweig who said (where... I could not find it anywhere) that it is easier to betray your country than your barber and your café. I like this saying and always thought about it when I betrayed Joseph and stopped going to him to cut my hair. It was some 5 years ago. Joseph became old, and his hands began shaking, and I felt, well, somewhat insecure having my ears near his scissors. I kept avoiding his shop ever since, although it was not so easy, as my children's school is located just in front of his shop.
Yesterday I passed there by chance and saw that the shop is closed for good, and a sign "to let" on its window. These kind of old style (no-bullshit-just-come-and-cut-your-hair) barbers are disappearing. The second oldest profession in the wrold is in danger, I guess.
Tags:

Time tunnel for free
Corvus albus
amonseuldesir

A Nazareth maiden. Dressed in antique brocade. [approximately 1920 to 1933]

The wonderful (an over-used adjective) collection of old photos from the Near East (Egypt, Syria, Lebannon, Palestine, Jordan, even Sudan), held at the American Colony in East Jersualem since the beginning of the 19th century, is now available at: http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/matpc/.
No copy-rights restrictions attached. A true time tunnel for free.

The Library of Utopia
Corvus albus
amonseuldesir


"I
n his 1938 book World Brain, H.G. Wells imagined a time—not very distant, he believed—when every person on the planet would have easy access to "all that is thought or known."

The 1930s were a decade of rapid advances in microphotography, and Wells assumed that microfilm would be the technology to make the corpus of human knowledge universally available. "The time is close at hand," he wrote, "when any student, in any part of the world, will be able to sit with his projector in his own study at his or her convenience to examine any book,any document, in an exact replica."

Wells's optimism was misplaced. The Second World War put idealistic ventures on hold, and after peace was restored, technical constraints made his plan unworkable. Though microfilm would remain an important medium for storing and preserving documents, it proved too unwieldy, too fragile, and too expensive to serve as the basis for a broad system of knowledge transmission. But Wells's idea is still alive. Today, 75 years later, the prospect of creating a public repository of every book ever published—what the Princeton philosopher Peter Singer calls "the library of utopia"—seems well within our grasp. With the Internet, we have an information system that can store and transmit documents efficiently and cheaply, delivering them on demand to anyone with a computer or a smart phone. All that remains to be done is to digitize the more than 100 million books that have appeared since Gutenberg invented movable type, index their contents, add some descriptive metadata, and put them online with tools for viewing and searching...." (read more)
[NICHOLAS CARR, MIT Technology Review]


Money? what do you mean?
Corvus albus
amonseuldesir
Sweden is on the path toward getting rid of paper currency, i.e., Sweden is becoming a cashless society (Read more).
Looking at this from the angle of ancient history this trend seems very odd. 
On the other hand do you remember what they have promised us some - what...mmm... 25 years ago? - with "paperless society"? I am not really sure that cashless society will be much different.




Dead Pope
Corvus albus
amonseuldesir

The dead Coptic Pope Shenouda III, venerated for the last time... (read and see more).
(This reminds me of Suleiman the Magnificent who died on September 5th 1566 in the siege of Szigetvar, Hungary. The dead monarch was dressed up by his Grand-vizier with his imperial robes and turban, placed on a chair under his tent until the siege was successfully completed. Then the dead Sultan was driven in the royal chariot to Istanbul. Only when he "entered safely" the palace and the hereditary arrangements were sealed, only then the monarach was officially declared dead...).


Encyclopaedia Britannica is going out of print
Corvus albus
amonseuldesir
Just to have it down, to remember the date.

My left foot (no, no: in fact my right one)
Corvus albus
amonseuldesir
So, I passed my (third!) meniscus operation two days ago. All is fine. I am already jumping back and forth, like kind of a funny bird.

(I have some wonderful photos of the inside-of-my-knee from the M.R.I procedure, but I am too shy to put them on... It looks like Apolo landing on the moon).
Tags:

Rainy window
Corvus albus
amonseuldesir

Jerusalem in the storm (homage to El Greco...)
Corvus albus
amonseuldesir

Flowers à la Emil Nolde
Corvus albus
amonseuldesir

?

Log in